<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;"><div><div>On 10 Mar 2014, at 16:53, Stan Lagun <<a href="mailto:slagun@mirantis.com">slagun@mirantis.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Mar 10, 2014 at 12:26 PM, Renat Akhmerov <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:rakhmerov@mirantis.com" target="_blank">rakhmerov@mirantis.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; border-left-width: 1px; border-left-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); border-left-style: solid; padding-left: 1ex; position: static; z-index: auto;"><div class=""><br></div><div>In case of Amazon SWF it works in the opposite way. First of all itís a language agnostic web service, then they have language specific frameworks working on top of the service.</div>

</blockquote></div><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">The big question here is would SWF be popular (or at least usable in real-world scenarios) without language-specific framework on top? <br></div></div></blockquote><br></div><div>Legitimate question. I would say ďnoĒ. The thing is that SWF web service was not designed for direct usage in the first place. We believe itís possible to do for a number of use cases although doesnít cancel the idea of having language bindings. Life will tell.</div><br></body></html>